1. 00:52 6th Dec 2013

    Notes: 114

    Reblogged from nprfreshair

    image: Download

    nprfreshair:

Today science journalist Douglas Starr speaks to Fresh Air about how certain interrogation techniques elicit false confessions. He explains why people might confess falsely:

First of all, there’s a group of people who confess falsely to something because there’s something wrong with them. More than 200 people confessed to the kidnapping and murder of the Lindbergh baby. … But there are external reasons as well. … If you’re held in a room and you think there’s no way out but you’re sure that the justice system with eventually exonerate you, you might actually confess just to get out of the situation. When you’re in a situation where [your] denial is batted away no matter what you say and they start lowering the barrier of confession … it becomes the easy way out. Interestingly, naive people, with faith in the justice system, tend to confess more because they’re sure something will work out on the other side. The trouble is confession trumps everything. Even physical evidence will bend once somebody’s confessed because confessions are so compelling.


Hear Starr’s interview or read more about these techniques here 
Or read his article in this week’s issue of The New Yorker 



photo via living fine art assoc.

    nprfreshair:

    Today science journalist Douglas Starr speaks to Fresh Air about how certain interrogation techniques elicit false confessions. He explains why people might confess falsely:

    First of all, there’s a group of people who confess falsely to something because there’s something wrong with them. More than 200 people confessed to the kidnapping and murder of the Lindbergh baby. … But there are external reasons as well. … If you’re held in a room and you think there’s no way out but you’re sure that the justice system with eventually exonerate you, you might actually confess just to get out of the situation. When you’re in a situation where [your] denial is batted away no matter what you say and they start lowering the barrier of confession … it becomes the easy way out. Interestingly, naive people, with faith in the justice system, tend to confess more because they’re sure something will work out on the other side. The trouble is confession trumps everything. Even physical evidence will bend once somebody’s confessed because confessions are so compelling.

    Hear Starr’s interview or read more about these techniques here

    Or read his article in this week’s issue of The New Yorker

    photo via living fine art assoc.

     
  2. 00:51

    Notes: 283

    Reblogged from think-progress

    think-progress:

    Course 101: When can you not say “legitimate rape”…

     
  3. 00:51

    Notes: 52

    Reblogged from brooklynmutt

    brooklynmutt:

smh
     
  4. 00:50

    Notes: 15

    Reblogged from futurejournalismproject

    image: Download

    futurejournalismproject:

A History of Documentary + Technology
If you didn’t check it out last year, MIT’s Open Documentary Lab and IDFA’s DocLab created a fantastically visual history of documentary in Moments of Innovation. It’s an interactive site that covers various histories of innovation in documentary such as location-based documentary, beginning with Sanborn fire insurance maps in 1867 and ending with Arcade Fire’s music video, The Wildnerness Downtown, or participatory documentary, beginning with the brownie camera and ending with #18daysinEgypt. 
They explain:

We are interested in history, in connecting the dots between our latest endeavors and those conceptual pioneers and technological prototypes that came before them. We consider innovation both in the creative application of new technologies and in the creative impulse that lead documentarians to invent new technologies.
We are interested in continuities and disruptions, in tracking down origins and inspirations. Although our theme is evolutionary, we do not assume that recent instances are better than earlier ones – they are different, and our goal is to recall those earlier instances, to learn from and to celebrate them.

FJP: Totally interesting to explore. And feel free make suggestions for innovative moments to be added. And here’s an LA Times review.

    futurejournalismproject:

    A History of Documentary + Technology

    If you didn’t check it out last year, MIT’s Open Documentary Lab and IDFA’s DocLab created a fantastically visual history of documentary in Moments of Innovation. It’s an interactive site that covers various histories of innovation in documentary such as location-based documentary, beginning with Sanborn fire insurance maps in 1867 and ending with Arcade Fire’s music video, The Wildnerness Downtown, or participatory documentary, beginning with the brownie camera and ending with #18daysinEgypt. 

    They explain:

    We are interested in history, in connecting the dots between our latest endeavors and those conceptual pioneers and technological prototypes that came before them. We consider innovation both in the creative application of new technologies and in the creative impulse that lead documentarians to invent new technologies.

    We are interested in continuities and disruptions, in tracking down origins and inspirations. Although our theme is evolutionary, we do not assume that recent instances are better than earlier ones – they are different, and our goal is to recall those earlier instances, to learn from and to celebrate them.

    FJP: Totally interesting to explore. And feel free make suggestions for innovative moments to be added. And here’s an LA Times review.

     
  5. 00:49

    Notes: 557

    Reblogged from nprmusic

    image: Download

    nprmusic:

The African-American religious folk songs known as spirituals grew out of the slavery experience and the introduction of Christianity into slaves’ lives. Though rooted in African musical tradition, they reflected life in a strange and terribly oppressive new world. Often improvisations upon older hymns, they became entirely new songs — songs like “Sometimes I Feel Like a Motherless Child,” “Joshua Fit De Battle of Jericho” and “Steal Away.” In some ways, spirituals foreshadow the birth of American jazz.
Photo: Chris Ware/Getty Images

    nprmusic:

    The African-American religious folk songs known as spirituals grew out of the slavery experience and the introduction of Christianity into slaves’ lives. Though rooted in African musical tradition, they reflected life in a strange and terribly oppressive new world. Often improvisations upon older hymns, they became entirely new songs — songs like “Sometimes I Feel Like a Motherless Child,” “Joshua Fit De Battle of Jericho” and “Steal Away.” In some ways, spirituals foreshadow the birth of American jazz.

    Photo: Chris Ware/Getty Images

     
  6. 00:47

    Notes: 63

    Reblogged from fastcompany

    If you’re trying to cram three months of training into one week, the most important thing is separating techniques from attributes: If you’re trying to learn parkour, you need to figure out where you can cheat by refining technique and jumping to intermediate or advanced stuff. You also have to recognize that there are challenges and obstacles like tendons snapping because you don’t have the time to develop the increased power output or strength. The attributes take time to develop and they’re genetically limited, whereas the technique is something you can deconstruct and really learn quickly if you approach it with the proper framework and hacker mentality. Separating those two things out is very important.
     
  7. 00:46

    Notes: 26

    Reblogged from takepart

    takepart:

    In just 3 minutes, see how the media totally failed women in 2013.

    We’re all for Katniss and Malala, but that second half of the video is definitely cringeworthy. Ugh.

    [via]

     
  8. 00:45

    Notes: 5020

    Reblogged from huffposttv

     
  9. 00:42

    Notes: 60

    Reblogged from brooklynmutt

    brooklynmutt:

What is wrong with people?

    brooklynmutt:

    What is wrong with people?

     
  10. 00:40

    Notes: 1163

    Reblogged from motherjones

    motherjones:

    THE PRESIDENT: At his trial in 1964, Nelson Mandela closed his statement from the dock saying, “I have fought against white domination, and I have fought against black domination. I have cherished the ideal of a democratic and free society in which all persons live together in harmony and with…

     
  11. 00:39

    Notes: 1163

    Reblogged from brooklynmutt

    motherjones:

    THE PRESIDENT: At his trial in 1964, Nelson Mandela closed his statement from the dock saying, “I have fought against white domination, and I have fought against black domination. I have cherished the ideal of a democratic and free society in which all persons live together in…

     
  12. 00:39

    Notes: 355

    Reblogged from usatoday

    I learned that courage was not the absence of fear, but the triumph over it. The brave man is not he who does not feel afraid, but he who conquers that fear.
     
  13. 00:38

    Notes: 1217

    Reblogged from nbcnightlynews

    image: Download

    nbcnightlynews:

Marquee at the Apollo Theater in NYC

    nbcnightlynews:

    Marquee at the Apollo Theater in NYC